It is clear that the importance of trade relations between Britain and Chile should not be underestimated. On January 30, 2019, the two countries signed the Trade Continuity Agreement, securing long-term mutual commitments to maintain and deepen their trade relationship. “In both scenarios, the agreement we signed today means there will be no interruption in trade between Britain and Chile if the UK leaves the EU.” The following uk geographical indications, including `cross-border geographical indications`, which concern both the territory of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, are protected by this Agreement: trade with Japan represents only 2% of the UK`s total income, so the Government expects the Agreement to contribute 0.07% of GDP in the long term. Similarly, the clause under development has been amended to ensure that after two of their entry into force (and then every two years), the parties discuss how to improve their trade relations. The new agreement on trade continuity will benefit many sectors in both countries. As the UK prepares to leave the EU, it has made Chile one of its top trading partners for the future. Trade relations between countries have increased significantly since the first free trade agreement. In the absence of an agreement before 31 December, many imports and exports will be subject to charges that could increase prices for businesses and consumers. The agreement will also protect intellectual property rights and maintain preferential market access for trade in services. I think the discussions with Moldova, Georgia and Lebanon – all well-known wine producers – are led by the FCO and not the DfT and are “clearly distant” for delivery until the end of March. . . .