Many studies have investigated factors that could affect the degree of agreement among informants. Since this study focused on the concordance between parents and self-reports, we wanted to focus on the impact of parental and family factors and the characteristics of young people. The literature shows that parental and infant characteristics are likely to contribute to discrepancies between informants [18-21]. One study showed that parents agreed more on girls` problems than boys` [7] and there was conflicting evidence of the direction of the old age effect on informant agreements [10, 22, 23]. It has been reported that the quality of the parent-child relationship may also influence disagreements between parents and their children [19]. One study also showed that parental factors were correlated with differences of opinion among informants about the extent of problems faced by young people. This is not only because these parents provided an accurate description of the increased behavioural problems that arise in the home, but also because different parenting functions can themselves influence children`s behaviour and emotions [21]. An earlier study looked at negative life events and found that they could have a negative impact on parents` assessment of children`s problem behaviour [24]. No studies took into account the influence of the family environment on differences. It is generally accepted that the family environment has a direct and important influence on the behaviour of young people [25, 26]. All of these changes can have a positive or negative impact on young people, especially since Eastern culture requires Chinese youth to spend the most time with their families, while young people from Western cultures spend more time with their peers [4]. As a result, Chinese parents may be more familiar with their children and the family environment can strongly influence parents` and adolescents` understanding of youth issues.

Unfortunately, few studies have studied parent-youth agreement in China and the factors related to it have never taken into account the family environment. Only one study in Chinese adolescents reported an average CBCL-YSR correlation of 0.46, higher than the average level of 25 companies, if it was ranked according to the average cross-over-informant rate in the summarized results of the Rescorla study [12]. . . .